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Travel to Zimbabwe: U.S. White House issues statement on national emergency

Travel to Zimbabwe: U.S. White House issues statement on national emergency

eTurboNews -

It appears after Zimbabwe dictator Robert Mugabe was removed by a coup, there are some who actually wish the old regime was back and the country was back to what they define as normal, even peaceful.

Robert Mugabe, the recently deposed president of Zimbabwe, had been in power for 37 years, and his policies led to hyperinflation and a crumbling infrastructure. However, it was his desire to retain power that resulted in illegitimate elections and corruption. In 2017, members of his own party ousted him, replacing him with Vice President Emmerson Mnangagwa.

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Mnangagwa is nicknamed “Garwe” or “Ngwena” which means “the crocodile” in the Shona language, initially because that was the name of the guerrilla group he founded, but later because of his political shrewdness. The new president pledged an open government and a program to stabilize the ruined economy and boost foreign investment, but price hikes and high underlying inflation have led to street protests, and crime is running rampant. There have been reports of kidnappings, killings, and children being raped.

It is said that tourism may still be safe at and around Victoria Falls, but after observers from the European Union already rang the alarm on safety in the country, the US President is following suit. The US Department of State has issued a travel advisory to exercise increased caution in Zimbabwe due to crime and civil unrest. The advisory goes on to say that violent crime, such as assault, carjacking, and home invasion, is common. Smashing the windows of cars with the intent to steal, which can harm the driver or passengers, is also common.

The White House released this:

The White House
Office of the Press Secretary
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 4, 2019

NOTICE

CONTINUATION OF THE NATIONAL EMERGENCY WITH RESPECT TO ZIMBABWE

On March 6, 2003, by Executive Order 13288, the President declared a national emergency and blocked the property of certain persons, pursuant to the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701-1706), to deal with the unusual and extraordinary threat to the foreign policy of the United States constituted by the actions and policies of certain members of the Government of Zimbabwe and other persons to undermine Zimbabwe’s democratic processes or institutions. These actions and policies had contributed to the deliberate breakdown in the rule of law in Zimbabwe, to politically motivated violence and intimidation in that country, and to political and economic instability in the southern African region.

On November 22, 2005, the President issued Executive Order 13391 to take additional steps with respect to the national emergency declared in Executive Order 13288 by ordering the blocking of the property of additional persons undermining democratic processes or institutions in Zimbabwe.

On July 25, 2008, the President issued Executive Order 13469, which expanded the scope of the national emergency declared in Executive Order 13288 and authorized the blocking of the property of additional persons undermining democratic processes or institutions in Zimbabwe.

The actions and policies of these persons continue to pose an unusual and extraordinary threat to the foreign policy of the United States. For this reason, the national emergency declared on March 6, 2003, and the measures adopted on that date, on November 22, 2005, and on July 25, 2008, to deal with that emergency, must continue in effect beyond March 6, 2019. Therefore, in accordance with section 202(d) of the National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1622(d)), I am continuing for 1 year the national emergency declared in Executive Order 13288.

This notice shall be published in the Federal Register and transmitted to the Congress.

DONALD J. TRUMP
THE WHITE HOUSE
March 4, 2019

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